World Bank

Financial Stability Board Global Shadow Banking Monitoring Report 2013

FSB-ShadowBanking-2013

The shadow banking system can broadly be described as credit intermediation involving entities and activities outside the regular banking system. Intermediating credit through non-bank channels can have important advantages and contributes to the financing of the real economy, but such channels can also become a source of systemic risk, especially when they are structured to perform bank-like functions (e.g. maturity transformation and leverage) and when their interconnectedness with the regular banking system is strong. Therefore, appropriate monitoring of shadow banking helps to mitigate the build-up of such systemic risks. The FSB set out its approach for monitoring the global shadow banking system in its report to the G20 in October 2011. This report presents the results of the third annual monitoring exercise following this approach, using end-2012 data. The report includes data from 25 jurisdictions and the euro area as a whole, bringing the coverage of the monitoring exercise to about 80% of global GDP and 90% of global financial system assets.

World Bank Fraud, Corruption, and Collusion in the Roads Sector Report

Because an extensive, well maintained network of roads is essential for economic development, road construction and maintenance projects have been a mainstay of the World Bank’s lending portfolio since its founding. This long experience in the roads sector is reflected in favorable project evaluations. The Bank’s Independent Evaluation Group reports that roads and other transport projects consistently score higher on measures of outcomes, institutional development, and sustainability than non-transport projects and the Bank’s Quality Assurance Group has found that roads projects are well-supervised. At the same time, roads projects around the globe remain plagued by fraud, corruption, and collusion. A Transparency International poll ranked construction as the industry most prone to corruption and a survey of international firms revealed that companies in the construction industry were more likely than firms in any other sector to have lost a contract because of bribery. World Bank-financed projects are not immune. Roughly one-fourth of the 500 plus projects with a Bank-funded roads component approved over the past decade drew one or more allegations of fraud, corruption, or collusion; to date, the Bank’s Integrity Vice Presidency (INT) has confirmed allegations in 25 projects resulting in 29 cases of misconduct under Bank rules.

IMF/World Bank “Future of Global Financial and Monetary System” Seminar

In the context of rapidly increasing inter-dependence across national economies and shifting economic weight of different regions, the crisis has been a wake-up call for putting in place a global financial and monetary system that reduces the frequency and severity of crisis, underpinned by greater multilateralism in policymaking. Global cooperation and coordination on a wide set of issues, ranging from crisis prevention to regulatory and prudential reform and to provision of financial support, is critical for responding to the challenges presented by financial fragilities, external imbalances, weak fiscal positions and rising debt levels, and volatile capital flows.

UN/World Bank Afghanistan Drug Industry Report

The magnitude and importance of Afghanistan’s opium economy are virtually unprecedented and unique in global experience —it has been roughly estimated as equivalent to 36% of licit (i.e. non-drug) GDP in 2004/05, or if drugs are also included in the denominator, 27% of total drug-inclusive GDP (see Chapter 2). The sheer size and illicit nature of the opium economy mean that not surprisingly, it infiltrates and seriously affects Afghanistan’s economy, state, society, and politics. It generates large amounts of effective demand in the economy, provides incomes and employment including in rural areas (even though most of the final “value” from Afghan opium accrues outside the country), and supports the balance of payments and indirectly (through Customs duties on drug-financed imports) government revenues. The opium economy by all accounts is a massive source of corruption and undermines public institutions especially in (but not limited to) the security and justice sectors. There are worrying signs of infiltration by the drug industry into higher levels of government and into the emergent politics of the country. Thus it is widely considered to be one of the greatest threats to state-building, reconstruction, and development in Afghanistan.

Sierra Leone IDA-IMF Second Poverty Reduction Strategy Staff Advisory Note

This Joint Staff Advisory Note (JSAN) reviews Sierra Leone’s Second Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP-H) covering the period 2009-2012, The PRSP-I1 examines achievements and lessons learned under the first PRSP, analyzes challenges and constraints in the economy, and lays out the strategic priorities for accelerating growth and reducing Poverty.

Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique Regional Communications Infrastructure

Incomplete liberalization is keeping prices high. While many countries in the region have implemented reforms to promote greater competition and private sector participation in various ICT sub-sectors, incomplete liberalization in most of the region has allowed incumbent telecommunications operators to use their monopoly power to keep prices high in areas key to economic development such as international bandwidth and access to Internet. Over the past five years, the policy trend in the ICT sector has moved in one direction – that of more competition – and this i s having a significant positive impact on customers. However, a key issue which is emerging, particularly in relation to the development of backbone networks and broadband services, i s the details of market liberalization and regulation.

IBRD Tunisia Development Policy Loan

This Program Document proposes an Integration and Competitiveness Development Policy Loan (ICL) for Tunisia in the amount o f US$250 million. This ICL supports the key strategc elements o f Tunisia’s 1 I* National Development Plan (2007-1 1) which seeks to strengthen growth and ensure that this growth i s translated into employment. It is also a cornerstone of the World Bank’s program in Tunisia as outlined in the Country Assistance Strategy (FYO5-08) and the Country Assistance Strategy Progress Report (2007) that set out an indicative program for FY09-10.

Following Up on Accra: A World Bank Action Plan on Aid Effectiveness

In September 2008, nearly 2,000 people gathered in Accra, Ghana, for the Third High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF). They represented a wide range o f development actors-low-income countries, middle-income countries, fragile states, donor countries, international aid organizations, global funds, civil society organizations, parliaments, media-but they were united by the goal o f improving the delivery and use o f development assistance. To move this agenda forward, they ended the HLF by endorsing the Accra Agenda for Action (AAA).

Macedonia Country Partnership Strategy FY07-FY10

This Country Partnership Strategy Progress Report (CPSPR) assesses progress in implementing the FY07-10 Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (fYR Macedonia), which was discussed by the Board of Executive Directors on March 27, 2007.’ The CPSPR confirms the overall direction of the World Bank Group program while introducing adjustments to the evolving partnership through the remainder of the CPS period, including the introduction of a streamlined CPS results framework.

World Bank Afghanistan Interim Strategy Note FY07-FY08

Afghanistan’s political transformation, implemented according to the 200 1 Bonn Agreement was successfully concluded in late 2005. As a result o f that historic process, Afghanistan has developed a Constitution, conducted nationwide elections for a President and most recently has elected a Parliament and Provincial Councils. Notwithstanding these timely and commendable achievements, the normalization o f political culture still has a long way to go.

Analytical Methods for Modeling Pandemic Flu

RMS Profile
The world’s leading provider of products and services for the management of catastrophe

* Founded at Stanford University in 1989.
* 1,000+ employees worldwide, multidisciplinary development team includes blend of experts in hazard research, actuarial science, engineering and software development.
* Solely focused on independent view of risk quantification and risk management.

International Finance Corporation Annual Portfolio Performance Review FY09

This report provides (i) a brief overview of IFC’s investment environment and outlook for portfolio performance, (ii) a comprehensive review of IFC’s investment portfolio and performance and (iii) a review of the development effectiveness of IFC’s portfolio. The report should be viewed as a snapshot of portfolio trends as of the end of FY09 which will be supplemented throughout the year by IFC’s Quarterly Report to the Board, as well as other regular reports including IFC’s Annual Report, IFC’s Annual Report on Financial Risk Management and Capital Adequacy, IFC’s Business Plan and Budget, and IFC’s Road Map.

Bosnia and Herzegovina Country Assistance Strategy FY08-FY11

Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH) has made remarkable progress in post-conflict reconstruction, social integration and state building since the end of the 1992-95 war. The Dayton Peace Agreement, signed in 1995, established a complex governance structure comprising the Council of Ministers at the State-level government and two Entity Governments: the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (the Federation) and Republika Srpska (the RS). An autonomous Brcko District was added to the structure in 1999.

World Bank Investing in Indonesia’s Institutions FY09-12

This Country Partnership Strategy (CPS) for FY2009-12 marks Indonesia’s re-emergence as a confident middle-income country (MIC) that has graduated from IDA, and is enjoying a rising regional and global standing. With a Government that is demanding dependable and timely support for its own development priorities and its poverty-reduction agenda, this CPS positions the World Bank Group (WBG) to respond better to these challenges, thereby ensuring the WBG’s continued relevance in the new Indonesia.

Rwanda Country Assistance Strategy Completion Report

This review covers both the FYO3-05 CAS (extended to FY06) and the FYO6-08 Interim Strategy Note (ISN), as does the CASCR, and refers to the two documents together as the FY03 CAS, unless otherwise specified. The FY03 CAS sought to assist land-locked Rwanda to overcome the legacy of civil war, genocide, and cross-border war which left it with a per capita income of only US$210 in 2002, compared to US$370 in 1990. Its objectives were: (a) revitalization of the rural economy; (b) private sector development and employment creation; and (c) human and social development.

Joint Country Support Strategy for Kyrgyzstan 2007-2010

Задачи на пути развития. Кыргызская Республика, являющаяся горной страной без выхода к морским портам, сталкивается с труднопреодолимыми географическими барьерами в деле достижения высоких и устойчивых темпов экономического роста. Изолированность страны является серьезной преградой для развития международной торговли и перевозок, что далее усугубляется в силу неудовлетворительного состояния физической инфраструктуры и политики протекционизма, проводимой соседними государствами.

GEF Loan to Kazakhstan for Tien Shan Ecosystem Development Project

The Tien Shan mountain range covers most of the Kyrgyz Republic, southern Kazakhstan, and smaller areas of Uzbekistan, China, and Tajikistan. This territory plays an exceptional role in conserving biodiversity and maintaining environmental sustainability in Central Asia. In 2004, Conservation International (CI) identified the Tien Shan range as a “biodiversity hotspot” based on the high numbers of endemic species and the significant level of threat—the concentration of species in Western Tien Shan is 63 times higher for birds and 37 times higher for mammals than the average for Central Asia.

Joint Assistance Strategy for the United Republic of Tanzania FY2007 – FY2010

Through in-depth consultations, the Government of Tanzania finalized in June 2005 its second poverty reduction strategy called the “National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty”, or MKUKUTA, covering 2005-2010. The strategy identifies three clusters of broad outcomes: growth of the economy and reduction of income poverty; improvement of quality of life and social well-being; and governance and accountability.

Second Interim Strategy Note For the Republic of Iraq for the Period FY06-07

Iraq has had two political transitions over the past year, taking steps toward a constitutionally-elected government. Nevertheless, the country faces a violent insurgency that is impeding reconstruction and economic recovery. Immediate challenges are to restore rule of law, establish political legitimacy, and begin to build credible and inclusive institutions. The ability of the Iraqi Transitional Government to include ethnic and religious groups in the political process over the coming months will be important in determining whether a future constitutionally-elected government will improve security and stability, which are preconditions for successful reconstruction.

Country Assistance Strategy for The Oriental Republic of Uruguay 2005 – 2010

Uruguay is currently in the midst of a dual transition. First, there is an economic transition from the 2002 crisis towards a path of equitable and sustainable development, as the economy continues to recover strongly. Second, there is a political transition, as the victory of the Frente Amplio – Encuentro Progresista – Nueva Mayoría coalition in the October 2004 elections marked a new phase in the country’s political history.

Country Partnership Strategy for the Republic of Nicaragua

The FY03-05 CAS and the FY06-07 ISN were aligned around Nicaragua’s first Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) which was later revised and renamed the National Development Plan in 2005. Although Nicaragua’s core objective to reduce extreme poverty was not achieved to the extent desirable, achievements were made across the program with considerable progress in promoting a stable macroeconomic environment, reducing the fiscal deficit significantly, and lowering external debt to sustainable levels by achieving the HIPC Completion Point and obtaining further debt reduction through the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). Growth has been modest averaging around 3.2 percent per year since 2002, and exports have doubled. Though the Bank was instrumental in the increase of poverty spending from 9.6 percent of GDP in 2002 to 13.6 percent in 2006, greater expenditure has yet to translate into significant gains in poverty reduction.