ISAF/DoD Biometrics Tracking Afghanistan Photos

A British troop assigned to Royal Air Force II Squadron takes a photo of an Afghan detainee for biometric purposes, June 26, 2010, Dand District Kandahar, Afghanistan. RAF II Squadron partnered with the Afghan National Army 205th Corps and Afghan National Police to perform a joint patrol through local villages in search of insurgents, weapons caches and illegal drugs. As a result, three insurgents were found and detained, along with several pounds of marijuana. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kenny Holston)(Released)

U.S. Army Pfc. Andrew Bock, with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, uses Handheld Interagency Identification Detection Equipment (HIIDE) to gather information on an Afghan national during Operation Helmand Spider in Badula Qulp, Helmand province, Afghanistan, Feb. 15, 2010. HIIDE is a multimodal biometric system that collects and compares fingerprints and iris and facial photos against an internally downloaded biometric watch list. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Efren Lopez/Released)

PARWAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan –Patrolman Safidulla, an Afghanistan National Police officer from the Kuh-e Safi district, gets his biometrics put into a handheld interagency identity detection equipment database by 4th Platoon, Company B, Special Troops Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division Soldiers, at Dandar Patrol Base in Parwan, Afghanistan, Sept. 30. The system uses fingerprints, iris imaging and facial recognition technology and is similar to security measures for U.S. servicemembers and government employees obtaining work in their field. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. William E. Henry, Task Force Cyclon Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Pfc. Samuel R. Gronau collects biometrics from Afghan National Police (ANP) Col. Gul Mohammed in Taktehpol, Afghanistan, March 10, 2010. Gronau is assigned to Bravo Troop, 8th Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment and Mohammed is the commander of Taktehpol?s ANP division. (DoD photo by Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II, U.S. Air Force/Released)

A member of the Provincial Reconstruction Team uses the Handheld Interagency Identity Detection Equipment (HIIDE) to store biometric information of the Road Maintenance Team (RMT) workers at Forward Operating Base Kutschbach, Kapisa Province, Afghanistan, 30 March 2010. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Horace Murray/Released)(100330-A-3996M-082)

100116-F-1020B-101 Kabul - Minister of Interior Mohammad Hanif Atmar sits for his Afghan Automated Biometric Identification System (AABIS) photo at the grand opening of the new biometrics center at the Ministry of Interior (MOI). Minister Atmar officially registered in the new biometrics system, as all MOI employees are required to enroll in AABIS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Brown/RELEASED)

1006-N-6031Q-001 KABUL, Afghanistan -- Soldiers from the Afghan National Air Force participate in biometric data collection of their personal history, iris scan, thumb print, and urinalysis under a new accountability program in the Afghan Air Force. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David Quillen/ RELEASED).

1006-N-6031Q-001 KABUL, Afghanistan -- Maj. Gen. Abdul Sabour, Director of INtelligence for the Afghan National Air Force participates in biometric data collection of his personal history, iris scan, thumb print, and urinalysis under a new accountability program in the Afghan Air Force. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David Quillen/ RELEASED).

A soldier from 2nd Platoon, A Company, 1-503rd Infantry Battalion, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team enters a member of a private Afghan security company into the Biometrics Automated Toolset (BAT) Handheld Interagency Identity Detection Equipment (HIIDE) System near the village of Heyderk Hel, Wardak Province, Afghanistan, Feb.18, 2010. The BAT HIIDE System assists soldiers in community mapping. U.S. Army photo by Sgt Russell Gilchrest. (Released)

A British soldier with Royal Air Force II Squadron and Afghan National Police officers gather men from a village in Dand District to take their biometrics, June 26, Dand District, Kandahar, Afghanistan. RAF II Squadron partnered with the Afghan National Army 205th Corps and Afghan National Police to perform a joint patrol through local villages in search of insurgents, weapons caches and illegal drugs. As a result, three insurgents were found and detained, along with several pounds of marijuana.

Sgt. Nick Bender conducts an iris scan of an Afghan village elder's eye during a cordon and search mission Feb. 9, in Farah province, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The Marines use the Biometric Automated Toolset to identify Afghans by using fingerprints and iris scans. Bender is the Company-Level Intelligence Cell chief with Company I, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (Reinforced), the ground combat element of Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force - Afghanistan. The SPMAGTF-A mission is to conduct counterinsurgency operations, with a focus on training and mentoring the Afghan national police.

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Maxx A. Juusola, with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, gives an Afghan man a free radio after inputting his data into a biometrics automated tool set near Marjah, Afghanistan, Feb. 22, 2010. The biometrics tool is used to easily identify Afghans in the local area. (DoD photo by Cpl. Albert F. Hunt, U.S. Marine Corps/Released)

A US Army soldier uses the Handheld Interagency Identity Detection Equipment (HIIDE) system to create a biometric profile of a local villager. The data will be used to ensure security by preventing known threats from disrupting the village medical operation.

A US Army soldier uses the Handheld Interagency Identity Detection Equipment (HIIDE) system to create a biometric profile of a local villager. The data will be used to ensure security by preventing known threats from disrupting the village medical operation.

100603-F-1020B-032 Kandahar - U.S. Army soldiers conduct biometrics registration at an Afghan National Army sub-station in Kandahar province June 2, 2010. U.S. Army and NATO forces are partnering with Afghan National Police throughout the city as part of the "Hamkari," or cooperation concept. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sarah Brown/RELEASED)

8 comments for “ISAF/DoD Biometrics Tracking Afghanistan Photos

  1. Mule
    September 7, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    This is absolutely disgusting. How long until they start this in the united states? How long until we are living like the game Half-Life 2.

    • robertobeat
      June 10, 2011 at 3:11 pm

      Disgusting? No, this isn’t disgusting, this is allowing our Military to effectively fight the war on terrorism. Without these biometric tracking systems, our military and those of our allies in NATO, and certainly Afghanistan and Iraq, would be completely in the dark when it comes to investigating terror attacks around the world. Collecting and processing biometrics (finger prints, retina scans, or even DNA) is what gives our military the edge it needs to fight a very sneaky and well prepared terrorist network. Or do you want out military to fight with one hand tied behind its back?

      As for this ever coming to America; the good news is we have the Bill of Rights, peaceful elections, and an informed populace to ensure that things like this are not necessary in America. But, as always, ignorance is a free commodity; people can choose to not do their own homework and simply take the word of an elected official at face value. How long till we are living like the game half-life 2, you ask? The answer is, as long as it takes the American public to completely turn into sheep or, more aptly, into lemmings.

      • steelmoto
        January 6, 2012 at 9:28 pm

        How long until half-life 2? Just watch the world around you. America is letting it’s leaders do whatever they want, without having to answer to anyone. Slowly but surely, this world is being pushed into chaos so that the elites can push their NWO or One World Government…as for our the Bill of Rights, peacful elections and informed populace…where have you been? Our rights are being taken in the name of security against terror…politicians attacking eachother in the elections…And as for informed populace, you are only told in the media what they want you to know…there are a few media places that still are unbiased, but those are threatened by this stupid bill they are trying to pass with the stop online piracy and crap. They want to take over the internet and filter it, just like China. So when are we living in a half-life 2 kind of world? I think it’s a lot closer than any of us really realize…

      • johnny
        March 22, 2012 at 7:30 pm

        You dummy–the bill of rights in the US won’t protect anybody from this shit. Why don’t you try google searching FBI biometrics; look up their “next generation identification” program of getting all US citizens in a similar biometric database. And after you check that out, go fuck yourself you stupid piece of ignorant shit. And quit being a lap dog, dicksucking, fuckboy for the US government you braindead dicklicker.

  2. johnny
    March 22, 2012 at 7:34 pm

    Roberto–you stupid piece of wasted shitlife: even the establishment corporate washington post did an article on the topic: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/21/AR2007122102544_pf.html

  3. T
    April 26, 2012 at 6:03 pm

    I realize this post is old, but people still hit this page, so let me enlighten you all on this program.

    We have numerous programs in the US that require biometric enrollment. Let’s begin with CJIS, our criminal justice system, and the enrollment of ALL persons that are arrested. On the battlefield, we are doing enrollment at the point of detention; in the states, we do it as part of booking. Depending on the state, they are yet again enrolled at the point of incarceration- local prisons, awaiting trial. Upon conviction, they are yet again enrolled when inprocessed to whatever facility they are sentenced to do their time in. On the non-criminal side, we have programs that require enrollment for employment. Some states now require teachers, licensed daycare providers, counselors, and other professions that work with children must be enrolled. This is to protect our children from child molesters and people that have a criminal background. For those of you that protest this, next time you read about a teacher molesting a child, YOU should just shut your mouth- because of people like you, these people keep on getting employed into positions that allow them to repeat offend. Biometrics is not the boogie man. It is not “big brother” snooping into your lives. Biometrics allows us to make informed decisions and keep the wrong people from being in places or positions where they may do harm to our society. This door swings both ways- it allows us to confirm that a person is who they say they are, regardless of how similar they may look to a known felon. (just an example) Do not be so closed minded, this is the way of the future.

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