Documents

(U//FOUO) DHS Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) Construction Standards

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This handbook contains standard security designs and procedures common to Sensitive Compartmented Facilities (SCIF) and physical security construction standard and established by the Director National Intelligence (DNI) for protection of classified intelligence information. Users should refer to Director of Central Intelligence Directives (DCIDS) and other documents cited under Authorities for guidance on specific security functions.

UNODC Afghanistan Opium Survey 2014

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The Afghanistan Opium Survey is implemented annually by the Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN) of Afghanistan in collaboration with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The survey team collects and analyses information on the location and extent of opium cultivation, potential opium production and the socio-economic situation in rural areas. Since 2005, MCN and UNODC have also been involved in the verification of opium eradication conducted by provincial governors and poppy-eradication forces. The results provide a detailed picture of the outcome of the current year’s opium season and, together with data from previous years, enable the identification of medium- and long-term trends in the evolution of the illicit drug problem. This information is essential for planning, implementing and monitoring the impact of measures required for tackling a problem that has serious implications for Afghanistan and the international community.

NIST Special Publication 800-150: Guide to Cyber Threat Information Sharing Draft

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As the magnitude and complexity of cyberspace increases, so too does the threat1 landscape. Cyber attacks have increased in both frequency and sophistication resulting in significant challenges to organizations that must defend their infrastructure from attacks by capable adversaries. These adversaries range from individual attackers to well-resourced groups operating as part of a criminal enterprise or on behalf of a nation-state. These adversaries are persistent, motivated, and agile; and employ a variety of tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) to compromise systems, disrupt services, commit financial fraud, expose sensitive information, and steal intellectual property. To enhance incident response actions and bolster cyber defenses, organizations must harness the collective wisdom of peer organizations through information sharing and coordinated incident response. This publication expands upon the guidance introduced in Section 4, Coordination and Information Sharing of NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-61, Computer Security Incident Handling Guide and explores information sharing, coordination, and collaboration as part of the incident response life cycle.

(U//FOUO) CFIX Bulletin: Jihadist Propaganda Provides Guidance for Attacks on Law Enforcement

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Propaganda providing guidance and/or encouraging “individual jihad” or small cell operations against the West continues to be a prevalent theme in jihadist messaging. This bulletin was created by the CFIX in order to address recent propaganda from the Islamic State and its supporters which provides guidance on targeting law enforcement officers. The CFIX bases its analysis in this bulletin from open source reporting and internet postings with varying degrees of reliability, especially in regards to the true intention and capabilities of terrorist organizations and their supporters. This information is intended to support local, state and federal government agencies along with other entities in developing / prioritizing protective and support measures relating to an existing or emerging threat to homeland security.

(U//FOUO) Central Florida Information Exchange Brief: Ebola Guidance for Law Enforcement

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The purpose of this brief is to provide law enforcement, first responders, corrections officers, and other personnel who interact with the general public, with guidance and protective measures when coming in contact with individuals demonstrating symptoms of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). Personnel who become familiar with the identification of possible exposure, proper response protocols and protective measures will be better prepared to respond, secure, transport and decontaminate to prevent further spread of this deadly disease.

Defense Security Service Counterintelligence Best Practices for Cleared Industry

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United States cleared industry is a prime target of many foreign intelligence collectors and foreign government economic competitors. Cleared employees working on America’s most sensitive programs are of special interest to other nations. The number of reported collection attempts rises every year, indicating an increased risk for industry. While any geographic region can target sensitive or classified U.S. technology, DSS has consistently found that the majority of suspicious contacts reported by cleared industry originate from East Asia and the Pacific regions. Every region has active collectors. Cleared contractors should remain vigilant regardless of the collector’s assumed country of origin.

UN Use of Foreign Military and Civil Defence Assets (MCDA) for Ebola Response in West Africa

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The current Ebola virus disease outbreak was declared a ‘Public Health Emergency of International Concern’ by WHO on 8 August 2014. On 8 September, the UN Secretary-General activated the UN system-wide crisis framework and subsequently announced the establishment of the ‘United Nations Mission on Ebola Emergency Response’ – UNMEER. UNMEER is described as a ‘unified mission’, different from a ‘regular’ or ‘integrated’ mission, with HQ UNMEER in Accra, Ghana, and offices in each of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

UNOCHA Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination: A Guide for the Military

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National and foreign military forces can play a vital role in the response. In natural disasters, many national militaries are designated auxiliary or even primary first responders in-country. If a large-scale disaster exceeds the response capacity of an affected country, the Government may seek assistance from the international community or neighbouring and partner countries. As part of their response, foreign Governments tend to deploy their military forces, especially if these are already deployed in the region. In armed conflicts and complex emergencies, humanitarian and military actors share the same operating space, but not the same mission. They are likely to have very distinct roles and mandates.

U.S. Africa Command United Assistance Ebola Response Intelligence Summaries

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A collection of recent intelligence summaries for Operation United Assistance which is being conducted by U.S. Africa Command through U.S. Army Africa. The operation began in September and provides “coordination of logistics, training, and engineering support to the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in West Africa to assist in the overall U.S. Government Foreign Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief efforts to contain the spread of the Ebola Virus/Disease, as part of the international assistance effort supporting the Governments of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.”

Restricted U.S. Military Multi-Service Installation Emergency Management Manual

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Multi-Service Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Installation Emergency represents a significant renaming and revision to the November 2007 publication Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Installation CBRN Defense. It expands the scope from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense to all-hazards installation emergency management (IEM), including the management of CBRN events. This publication defines the roles of Department of Defense (DOD) installation commanders and staffs and provides the tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) associated with installation planning and preparedness for response to, and recovery from, hazards to save lives, protect property, and sustain mission readiness. The purpose of this publication is to summarize existing policies, responsibilities, and procedures for IEM programs at DOD installations worldwide for all hazards, as defined by DODI 6055.17, and to translate this policy into tactical terms applicable to military installation commanders.

DHS National Biosurveillance Integration Center Ebola Update October 14, 2014

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The most recent U.S. case, announced on 12 October 2014 is the first reported domestic transmission in the U.S. Three of the American EVD patients recovered and were discharged from the hospital, while three remain hospitalized. One American died while receiving treatment in Nigeria. The Liberian EVD patient was not symptomatic upon arrival and determined not to be infectious during travel. The Liberian patient died while in isolation on 8 October 2014. On 11 October 2014, the CDC and the Department of Homeland Security’s Customs & Border Protection (CBP) began enhanced entry screening of passengers with recent travel to West Africa at New York’s JFK International Airport. Enhanced entry screening is scheduled to begin on 16 October 2014 at Washington-Dulles, Newark, Chicago-O’Hare, and Atlanta international airports. Based on the recent domestic transmission, state and federal officials are re- examining whether equipment and procedures were properly followed, and whether additional protective steps and guidance are needed. The CDC believes the U.S. medical, public health infrastructure/responses are sufficient to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus in the U.S.

U.S. Africa Command United Shield Response to Ebola Operation Order

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As of 15 October 2014, the Ebola virus outbreak continues to expand and has infected nearly 4,249 and killed more than 2,458 people in Liberia. Although the Government of Liberia (GoL) continues an aggressive campaign of trying to inform and educate the population, overburdened medical infrastructure and cultural practices continue to hinder containment efforts. Isolated incidents of unrest have occurred, including demonstrations outside health care clinics and attacks on health care workers. The GoL has declared a National Emergency in order to (IOT) prevent the further spread of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD).

DHS National Biosurveillance Integration Center Enterovirus EV-D68 Update October 2014

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As of 3 October 2014, 43 states and the District of Columbia have reported 538 cases (+325 since 23 September 2014) of Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most of the cases have been identified among children; however, one case was identified in an adult. This outbreak was first announced in a media conference held on 8 September 2014. In this announcement, the CDC stated that EV-D68 was detected in clusters of individuals with respiratory illness in Kansas City, Missouri and Chicago, Illinois. Many of the initial identified cases had a history of asthma or wheezing. Recent increases in cases can be attributed to awareness of this issue among health officials and the amount of time necessary for disease investigation and confirmation. Current surveillance tools for influenza-like illness may not be appropriate for the detection of EV-D68 because many of the identified cases failed to develop fever. The CDC is involved in the ongoing investigation of a possible link between EV-D68 and acute paralysis. Furthermore, the CDC has identified EV-D68 in specimens from patients who have died, but the role of EV-D68 in these deaths remains unclear. EV-D68 has rarely been reported in the U.S. since first recognized in California in 1962. Enterovirus infections are not reportable in the U.S., so the illness is likely underreported because most enterovirus infections are self-limiting and do not require medical attention. The CDC estimates that non-polio enteroviruses are very common and are responsible for 10 to 15 million U.S. infections each year.

U.S. Army Special Operations Command Counter-Unconventional Warfare White Paper

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During the last decade, the U.S. military, along with its interagency and international partners, has generated significant capability to counter the irregular threats presented by non-state terrorists, insurgents, and criminal groups. During these same years, a distinct challenge to America and its partners in NATO and beyond has arisen through an innovative mix of such irregular threats. This challenge is Hybrid Warfare combining conventional, irregular, and asymmetric means, to include the persistent manipulation of political and ideological conflict. Foreshadowed by Iranian actions throughout the Middle East and by Chinese “unrestricted warfare” strategists in the 1990s, Hybrid Warfare has now reached its most brazen form in Russia’s support for separatist insurgents in Ukraine.

(U//FOUO) DHS National Risk Estimate: Risks to U.S. Critical Infrastructure from Insider Threat

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The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Homeland Infrastructure Threat and Risk Analysis Center (HITRAC) produced this National Risk Estimate (NRE) to provide an authoritative, coordinated, risk-informed assessment of the key security issues faced by the Nation’s infrastructure protection community from malicious insiders. DHS used subject matter expert elicitations and tabletop exercises to project the effect of historic trends on risks over the next 3 to 5 years. In addition, DHS used alternative futures analysis to examine possible futures involving insider threats to critical infrastructure over the next 20 years. The results are intended to provide owners and operators a better understanding of the scope of the threat and can inform mitigation plans, policies, and programs, particularly those focused on high-impact attacks.

National Institute of Justice Body Cavity Screening Technology Assessment and Market Survey

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Body scanners are used to screen for contraband in a variety of places. Airports, schools, government buildings, and corrections facilities are examples of the types of places that have employed body scanners. Different types of body scanners have different capabilities based on the imaging technologies used and the sophistication of the internal system analysis. Metal detection was one of the first technologies developed to identify metallic objects on a person, but contraband can take many other forms, such as powders (e.g., drugs), paper (e.g., money), and even ceramic or plastic weapons. Correctional facilities in particular are faced with various forms of contraband, and with elaborate methods of evading detection employed by the local population. Manufacturers have responded by producing scanners that are able to detect nonmetallic contraband, as well as systems that can detect contraband inside body cavities. This report identifies commercially available body scanners and discusses the technologies used by these products. Technological limitations pertaining to the type of materials detected and/or the ability to detect contraband inside body cavities are discussed.