U.S. Army

U.S. Army Information Technology Agency WikiLeaks Phishing Warning

ITA is pleased to provide this information update as part of our commitment to support your information assurance efforts. All users are strongly advised against attempting to access information posted on the Internet or browse websites that claim to contain classified information from government owned computing systems. This message is in accordance with Headquarters Department of the Army issued All Army Activities (ALARACT) message issued on August 14, 2010 related to the WikiLeaks website. In addition, the Office of the Administrative Assistant (OAA) Communications has advised that all Department of Defense employees are not permitted to access, review, or search for any material pertaining to the WikiLeaks website from a government-issued computer. Users are advised that doing so may include the user as part of the formal ongoing investigation.

U.S. Army FM 3-19.15 Civil Disturbance Operations

Field Manual (FM) 3-19.15 addresses continental United States (CONUS) and outside continental United States (OCONUS) civil disturbance operations. Today, United States (US) forces are deployed on peacekeeping, peace enforcement, and humanitarian assistance operations worldwide. During these operations, US forces are often faced with unruly and violent crowds intent on disrupting peace and the ability of US forces to maintain peace. Worldwide instability coupled with increasing US military participation in peacekeeping and related operations requires that US forces have access to the most current doctrine and tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) necessary to quell riots and restore public order.

U.S. Army Military Police Civil Disturbance and Martial Law Training Course

Civil disturbances may be riots, violent uprisings, or unlawful actions. As a member of the military forces, you may be ordered under certain conditions to help restore law and order and protect property. The National Guard is likely to face most of the violence during demonstrations. To gain successful control of a civil disturbance, it will require an understanding of the reason for social unrest and basic human behavior patterns. Planning control strategy depends on knowing why people behave as they do. Group behavior sets the scene for civil disturbances. However, it is individual behavior which in the end is the most important.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army Zero-Point Energy Assessment

(U) Zero-point energy (a very general term) is the lowest energy that a given quantum mechanical system can have (i.e., the ground state of the system). In quantum field theory, it refers to the energy of the vacuum (i.e., a space devoid of matter [the energy of “nothing”]). In this paper, we will use the abbreviation ZPE (as is commonly used by those in the field) to refer to the vacuum energy for use in applications.

(U//FOUO) Asymmetric Warfare Group “Attack The Network” Counterinsurgency Methodology

This document continues discussion on effective targeting methods (lethal and non-lethal) at the Battalion and Brigade level. It continues dialogue on Attacking the Network by further describing Center of Gravity and Critical Vulnerability analysis themes and their link to network modeling. This document also discusses the use of detailed, Observable Indicators to focus Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance assets against the enemy’s vulnerabilities. A modified Intelligence Synchronization Matrix (ISM) ensures integration and synchronization to the friendly course of action in a Counter-Insurgency environment. Using doctrinal and situational templates and a modified ISM helps the S2 understand the insurgent networks operating in his Area of Interest, focus assets against the known or suspected Critical Vulnerabilities, and synchronize ISR to give the commander the information he needs at the Decision Points.

(U//FOUO) Army Unauthorized Information Dissemination Safeguards in Response to WikiLeaks

(U/FOUO) 1. ALL ARMY ACTIVITIES ARE DIRECTED TO IMMEDIATELY REVIEW AND REVALIDATE WHO HAS SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR(SA)/POWER USER PRIVILEGES. IN ACCORDANCE WITH (IAW) REF A, THESE PERSONNEL SHALL BE GRANTED THE MINIMUM SET OF PRIVILEGES REQUIRED TO PERFORM THEIR JOBS AND NOTHING MORE. ALL ACTIVITIES MUST ENSURE THAT THEY HAVE IDENTIFIED THESE PERSONNEL AND THAT NO OTHER PERSONNEL HAVE THESE PRIVILEGES. THIS IS KEY TO PRECLUDING UNAUTHORIZED DOWNLOADING AND DISSEMINATION OF SOFTWARE AND INFORMATION.

(U//FOUO) Army WikiLeaks Warning: Classified Public Information

ARMY PERSONNEL MUST BE VIGILANT WITH REGARD TO THE INFORMATION POSTED ON THE WIKILEAKS WEBSITE AND ANY OTHER WEBSITE THAT PURPORTS TO PUBLISH CLASSIFIED INFORMATION. VIEWING, DOWNLOADING OR PRINTING INFORMATION FROM THE WEBSITE COULD POTENTIALLY EXPOSE ARMY NETWORKS TO SENSITIVE DATA OR CREATE SITUATIONS IN WHICH DATA IS IMPROPERLY SAFEGUARDED THUS HARMING OUR ABILITY TO CONDUCT MISSIONS VITAL TO OUR NATIONAL DEFENSE. INFORMATION MARKED AS CLASSIFIED BUT IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN IS NOT CONSIDERED DECLASSIFIED UNTIL ASSESSED BY THE APPROPRIATE ORIGINAL CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY AND A DETERMINATION ON ITS DISPOSITION AND CONTINUED CLASSIFICATION IS RENDERED.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army Tactical Combat Casualty Care Handbook

Tactical combat casualty care (TCCC) is the pre-hospital care rendered to a casualty in a tactical, combat environment. The principles of TCCC are fundamentally different from those of traditional civilian trauma care where most medical providers and medics train. These differences are based on both the unique patterns and types of wounds that are suffered in combat and the tactical conditions medical personnel face in combat. Unique combat wounds and tactical conditions make it difficult to determine which intervention to perform at what time. Besides addressing a casualty’s medical condition, responding medical personnel must also address the tactical situation faced while providing casualty care in combat. A medically correct intervention performed at the wrong time may lead to further casualties. Put another way, “good medicine may be bad tactics,” which can get the rescuer and casualty killed. To successfully navigate these issues, medical providers must have skills and training oriented to combat trauma care, as opposed to civilian trauma care.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army Radio Operator Handbook

The unit radio operator (RO) provides platoon- to brigade-level maneuver leaders a command and control capability that is critical to mission success. The RO is more than a Soldier who carries the radio for the commander, serves as the commander’s driver, or provides the commander personal security, although he often serves in these functions. The RO is the commander’s tactical information manager. The process for selecting and training an RO varies widely and is based on the role the unit commander intends the RO to perform; however, there are common factors that every maneuver RO should possess in order to enable effective unit command and control.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army “Unit RESET” Redeployment Handbook

For purposes of this handbook, unit RESET is the process a unit uses to plan and execute those critical tasks needed to restore the unit to combat readiness after redeployment. This process must be carefully planned and synchronized by all stakeholders, beginning with actions a unit sets in place before the unit deploys. The unit follows the RESET model published in Army RESET ordersand executes RESET tasks while still in theater to redeploy and return the unit to collective training capability as quickly as possible. This enormous task is complex and requires detailed planning, clear communication and intent, and strong unit leadership not only from the unit conducting RESET but also from those supporting the mission (e.g., garrison, contractors, and other Department of Defense organizations). The goal is returning the unit to combat readiness quickly, efficiently, and—most importantly—safely.

(U//FOUO) Commander’s Emergency Response Program (CERP) Handbook

The Commander’s Emergency Response Program (CERP) has become a critical capability in the commander’s toolbox for conducting stability operations. CERP funds provide tactical commanders a means to conduct multiple stability tasks that have traditionally been performed by U.S., foreign, or indigenous professional civilian personnel or agencies. These tasks include but are not limited to the reconstruction of infrastructure, support to governance, restoration of public services, and support to economic development. This handbook focuses on basic tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) for the application of the CERP. Its intended audience is the brigade, battalion, and provincial reconstruction team commander and staff. This handbook is based on lessons learned and best practices in use today in both Iraq and Afghanistan and identifies the training, planning, and operational procedures required to fund projects and services the commander requires during the conduct of stability operations. This handbook also provides the TTP to guide the commander through the regulatory and administrative requirements of the CERP.

Operation Iraqi Freedom “Demons in Baghdad” Report

To establish a single source of facts documenting the 728th Expeditionary Air Control Squadron‘s deployment to Baghdad in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF). This final report is based on information collected from each of the squadron’s work centers in garrison, prior to deployment and during operations at Camp Griffin, Baghdad International Airport, Iraq.

FM 31-27 Pack Animals in Support of Special Operations Forces

This manual provides guidance for training Army special operations forces (ARSOF) personnel in the techniques of animal pack transport and for organizing and operating pack animal units. It captures some of the expertise and techniques that have been lost in the United States (U.S.) Army over the last 50 years. The chapters on care, feeding, and veterinary medicine compose a considerable portion of the manual; however, this material is not intended as a substitute for veterinary expertise nor will it make a veterinarian out of the reader. ARSOF personnel must have a rudimentary knowledge of anatomy and physiology, common injuries, diseases (particularly of the feet), feeding, and watering to properly care for the animals and to avoid abusing them from overloading or overworking.

U.S. Army Mechanisms of Afghan Insurgent Control and Local Governance

(U) Many students of insurgency and counterinsurgency attest to the importance of popular support to each side’s quest to achieve its objectives. Key aspects of popular support, including type (passive or active) and scope (limited or significant), are inarguably important in analyzing an insurgency. However, focusing solely or immediately on these aspects risks glossing over insurgent efforts to set conditions necessary to mobilize such support in the first place. Most notably, these conditions include the generation of compliance and the establishment and institutionalization of control.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army SWEAT/Infrastructure Reconnaissance Book

Similar to the Red Book and Sand Book, the SWEAT Book is the Soldier’s reference for Infrastructure Reconnaissance. While the Red and Sand Books focus on different regions, the SWEAT Book focuses on the subject regardless of the part of the world the Soldier may be located. The SWEAT Book is the continuation of the hard work of many organizations to include the National Training Center (the Sidewinders), countless MTOE units, the U.S. Army Engineer School, the Engineer Research and Development Center – (CERL), the U.S. Military Academy, etc. The efforts of all those involved has led to the continued progress towards solving this gap in our capabilities. Future work to be expected includes continued feedback from units supporting missions in OEF/OIF, and U.S.M.A.’s research on an infrastructure assessment methodology. The SWEAT Book will be updated accordingly.

(U//FOUO) Battle Staff NCO CALL Handbook

The advice from this battle-experienced commander is no less relevant today in Iraq and Afghanistan. Battle staffs working in CPs must remain adaptive and proactive in the operational environment (OE) to effectively predict events, engage the threat, and protect friendly forces. Battle staffs predict events to defeat the enemies’ systems and networks. The battle staff noncommissioned officer (NCO) plays an important role in this process.

(U//FOUO) Center for Army Lessons Learned “How the Taliban Take a Village”

A current method used by the Taliban in Afghanistan to gain control of an area deemed of strategic interest to the Taliban leadership, which operates from safe havens in Pakistan or within Afghanistan, is to identify and target villages to subvert. The Taliban have recognized the necessity to operate with the cooperation of the local population, with their modus operandi being to gain villagers’ cooperation through indoctrination (preferred) or coercion (when necessary).

(U//FOUO) TACTICOMP/Ku SATCOM Procurement Report

Under DA Authorization, TRADOC and Rapid Equipment Fielding (REF) purchased TACTICOMP and Ku SATCOM systems for the 1-23 IN, 3/2 SBCT for use during a National Training Center (NTC) mission readiness exercise and future deployment. TRADOC Spiral Development Division tasked USAIC Infantry Futures and the SBL to observe the unit and their employment of these systems. The observation team was a compilation of personnel from the SBL Futures Branch, TSM-SB C4ISR, and DCD Battle Command Division.

U.S. Army Improvised Explosive Device Effects Simulator (IEDES) Program

The IED Effects Simulator (IEDES) kit is a Training Aids Device that will assist the Army in training the joint and individual service on operational support tasks, conditions, and standards needed to achieve U.S. Military IED objectives. The IEDES is configured to simulate a Small, Medium, Large, and Extra Large explosive signature. The IEDES is designed to train key tasks of Explosive Hazards (EHs) defeat, to predict, prevent, detect, classify, neutralize, mark, report and record EH and to protect personnel, equipment and facilities from EH effects.