Department of Defense

(U//FOUO) Kabul Children’s Hospital Atmospheric Assessment

(U//FOUO) BLUF: This facility is in dire need of assistance. Daily there are hundreds of children in admittance to this hospital suffering from the following ailments: malnutrition, burns, blast trauma, and the need for urgent surgical intervention. There are very few medical supplies available (few families of the patients can afford the medicine), minimal food (limited to one meal a day), and no consumable medical materials available to adequately treat these patients. The inevitability of death for many of these patients becomes a reality.

(U//FOUO) Afghanistan Atmospheric Report: No Unified Reason to Fight, No Way to Peace

(U//FOUO) ATMOSPHERIC VALUE: Negative: The local people of Zabul Province do not believe that there can be peace made with the Taliban by giving in to some of their demands because there are so many different Taliban leaders fighting for different reasons and goals it would be hard to satisfy all of their demands.

Utah Data Center

The Utah Data Center (UDC) will be a highly secure 65 Mega Watt, Tier III National Security Agency datacenter facility to be located near Camp Williams, Utah. The fast-track program will consist of approximately 1 million ft2 of new facilities, of which 100,000 ft2 will be mission-critical space with raised flooring, and the other 900,000 ft2 will be devoted to technical support and administrative space. Ancillary support facilities include water treatment facilities, electrical substations, a vehicle inspection facility and visitor control center, perimeter site security measures, fuel storage, chiller plants and fire suppression systems. The UDC will incorporate green building strategies and will be required to be a LEED certified facility, with the goal of obtaining a LEED Silver rating.

Operation Iraqi Freedom “Demons in Baghdad” Report

To establish a single source of facts documenting the 728th Expeditionary Air Control Squadron‘s deployment to Baghdad in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM (OIF). This final report is based on information collected from each of the squadron’s work centers in garrison, prior to deployment and during operations at Camp Griffin, Baghdad International Airport, Iraq.

FM 31-27 Pack Animals in Support of Special Operations Forces

This manual provides guidance for training Army special operations forces (ARSOF) personnel in the techniques of animal pack transport and for organizing and operating pack animal units. It captures some of the expertise and techniques that have been lost in the United States (U.S.) Army over the last 50 years. The chapters on care, feeding, and veterinary medicine compose a considerable portion of the manual; however, this material is not intended as a substitute for veterinary expertise nor will it make a veterinarian out of the reader. ARSOF personnel must have a rudimentary knowledge of anatomy and physiology, common injuries, diseases (particularly of the feet), feeding, and watering to properly care for the animals and to avoid abusing them from overloading or overworking.

Human Terrain System Afghan Saffron Report

Saffron, referred to by some as “red gold,” has been in demand for centuries. The Latin name for the plant which bears the delicate spice is Crocus sativus L. Saffron growing has been promoted in Afghanistan in recent years in response to a call from the Afghan government to investigate economically viable licit alternatives to poppy. Due to the significant labor costs inherent to saffron production, saffron is the world’s most expensive spice. Not only are saffron profits competitive with opium, in relation to other licit crops, but saffron needs little water during growth, requires minimal refinement, and has a low volume and weight, making it easily transportable.

Human Terrain System Report: Salafist and Wahhabist Influence in Afghanistan

Afghanistan is in many ways an unlikely home for radical Islamic ideologies. Afghan religious life until the 1950s was, and in many places still is, traditional, conservative, rural, and mystical. Just as Afghanistan was politically and ethnically highly fragmented, religious life has also varied tremendously depending on region, ethno-linguistic group, and degree of urbanization.

U.S. Army Mechanisms of Afghan Insurgent Control and Local Governance

(U) Many students of insurgency and counterinsurgency attest to the importance of popular support to each side’s quest to achieve its objectives. Key aspects of popular support, including type (passive or active) and scope (limited or significant), are inarguably important in analyzing an insurgency. However, focusing solely or immediately on these aspects risks glossing over insurgent efforts to set conditions necessary to mobilize such support in the first place. Most notably, these conditions include the generation of compliance and the establishment and institutionalization of control.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Air Force Vehicle Bomb Mitigation Guide

This guide presents reference material associated with planning and executing programs and operations for protecting Air Force personnel and assets against the threat of vehicle bombs – it is designed for use by a variety of key players, ranging from the Airman at the base gate to the Installation Commander. As with all sound force protection efforts, this guide tackles the threat class using a multi-dimensional approach incorporating threat detection and loss mitigation.

(U//FOUO) U.S. Army SWEAT/Infrastructure Reconnaissance Book

Similar to the Red Book and Sand Book, the SWEAT Book is the Soldier’s reference for Infrastructure Reconnaissance. While the Red and Sand Books focus on different regions, the SWEAT Book focuses on the subject regardless of the part of the world the Soldier may be located. The SWEAT Book is the continuation of the hard work of many organizations to include the National Training Center (the Sidewinders), countless MTOE units, the U.S. Army Engineer School, the Engineer Research and Development Center – (CERL), the U.S. Military Academy, etc. The efforts of all those involved has led to the continued progress towards solving this gap in our capabilities. Future work to be expected includes continued feedback from units supporting missions in OEF/OIF, and U.S.M.A.’s research on an infrastructure assessment methodology. The SWEAT Book will be updated accordingly.

Yakima Training Center

The Yakima Training Center (YTC) is a United States Army training center (Army maneuver training and live fire area) located in south central Washington state. It is bounded on the west by Interstate 82, on the south by the city of Yakima, on the north by the city of Ellensburg and Interstate 90, and on the east by the Columbia River. It comprises 327,000 acres (132,332 hectares) of land, most of which consists of shrub-steppe, making it one of the largest areas of shrub-steppe habitat remaining in Washington state. According to a 2001 report by the European Parliament, the Yakima Training Center is also an integral part of the ECHELON global communications interception system.

Defense Readiness Reporting System Software User Manual 4.5.12

The Secretary of Defense directed that DRRS reflect a “transformational” response to significant changes in the strategic environment leading to increasing focus on capabilities-based operations and the rapid tailoring of resources. This transformation provides a unique and timely opportunity to change how the Department measures, assesses, and reports its readiness, and how it uses readiness information in planning and contingency response. Current global operations reinforce the urgent need for a readiness system that can provide accurate, relevant, and timely information to support operational planning as well as offer risk assessments of multiple simultaneous contingencies in the context of the Defense Strategy.

Naval Security Group Activity (NAVSECGRUACT) Sugar Grove

Sugar Grove is an American government communications site located in Pendleton County, West Virginia operated by the National Security Agency. According to a December 25, 2005 article in the New York Times, the site intercepts all international communications entering the Eastern United States. The site was first developed by the Naval Research Laboratory in the early 1960s as the site of a 600 ft (180 m) radio telescope that would gather intelligence on Soviet radar and radio signals reflected from the moon and would gather radioastronomical data on outer space, but the project was halted in 1962 before the telescope construction was completed.[1] The site was then developed as a radio receiving station. The site was activated as “Naval Radio Station Sugar Grove” on May 10, 1969, and two Wullenweber Circulary Disposed Antenna Arrays (CDAAs) were completed on November 8, 1969. Numerous other antennas, dishes, domes, and other facilities were constructed in the following years. Some of the more significant radio telescopes on site are a 60 ft (18 m) dish (oldest telescope on site), a 105 ft (32 m) dish featuring a special waveguide receiver and a 150 ft (46 m) dish (largest telescope on site).

(U//FOUO) Battle Staff NCO CALL Handbook

The advice from this battle-experienced commander is no less relevant today in Iraq and Afghanistan. Battle staffs working in CPs must remain adaptive and proactive in the operational environment (OE) to effectively predict events, engage the threat, and protect friendly forces. Battle staffs predict events to defeat the enemies’ systems and networks. The battle staff noncommissioned officer (NCO) plays an important role in this process.

Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Detailed Governance Information

Afghanistan’s government structure is designed around a strong, democratic national government. At the national level, the three branches (Executive, Legislative, and Judicial) form the foundation of the government, but other entities, such as ministries, the Afghan National Security Forces (military and police), and commissions also carry out government obligations. Below the national level, the public sector consists of provincial-level governments, municipalities, and finally district-level government. However, unlike the U.S. government, each of the 34 provinces does not operate independently of the national government. Kabul, the capital, is the seat of power. Each province answers to the national government.

U.S. Plan for Sustaining the Afghanistan National Security Forces

This report to Congress is submitted consistent with Section 1231 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181). It includes the United States plan for sustaining the Afghanistan National Security Forces (ANSF). In accordance with subsection (a), it includes a description of the long-term plan for sustaining the ANSF, with the objective of ensuring that the ANSF will be able to conduct operations independently and effectively and maintain long-term security and stability in Afghanistan. The report includes a comprehensive strategy and budget, with defined objectives; mechanisms for tracking funding, equipment, training, and services provided to the ANSF; and any actions necessary to assist the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to achieve a number of specified goals and the results of such actions. This report is the first of the annual reports required through 2010 on the long-term plan for Afghanistan.

Iraq/Afghanistan Business Development and Outreach Program (SDOP) SOP

The purpose of the Business Development and Outreach Program (BDOP) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) is to define the BOOP mission, roles and responsibilities of the Business Development Consultants (SOC) and the J3lDirector, BDOP, U.S. Government contracting procedures, ethical guidelines, BDOP initiatives, education, training and consulting support, vendor engagements, local engagement with government and business leaders, and cultural orientation for u.s. Forces Iraq/Afghanistan and Iraqi/Afghan interlocutors.

DoD Theater Army Operational & Organizational (O&O) Concept (v5.4)

This Organization and Operations plan (O&O) is based upon a revised operational concept for Theater Army developed as a result of analysis, discussion, and decisions made by senior Army leaders under Army Campaign Plan (ACP) Decision Point 129 (DP 129), Global Command & Control (C2) Laydown, and DP 123, Division, Corps, and Theater Army Design Refinement. The new Army strategy for global command and control of Army forces relies on the Modular Corps headquarters to C2 major operations instead of theater armies. Under the revised operational concept, theater armies no longer require large Operational Command Posts (OCP) to serve as the base organization for the formation of Joint Task Force (JTF) or Joint Force Land Component Command (JFLCC)/Army Force (ARFOR) headquarters to command and control major operations.