Department of Homeland Security

Terrorism Liaison Officer (TLO) Program

The Terrorism Liaison Officer (TLO) is designed to be a nationally interconnected program of designated law enforcement officers, firefighters, military, and other first responders that attend an approved and accredited course of instruction. This shared learning experience prepares the TLOs to fill a specific role within their organization as a link or “liaison.” The TLO program was initiated in California via the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) around 2005-2006 by a Anthony Lukin. According to several proposals for the program, Fusion Centers in California “utilize the Terrorism Liaison Officer (TLO) Program to foster communication and collaboration amongst the fire service; law enforcement; the federal homeland security and intelligence communities and public safety stakeholders. The TLOs serve as the conduit through which homeland security and crime-related information flows from the field to the Fusion Center for assessment and analysis. The network also serves as the vehicle to carry actionable intelligence from the Fusion Center to field personnel. This information flow provides for increased safety and security for fire department personnel as well as the communities served.”

DHS Computer-Aided Dispatch Interoperability Project

The Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Interoperability and Compatibility (OIC) launched the Computer‐Aided Dispatch (CAD) Interoperability Project (CADIP) in May 2007. CAD systems, which dispatch emergency services and assist 9‐1‐1 operators and dispatchers in handling and prioritizing requests for resources, serve as a major component in responding to critical incidents. CADIP addresses an issue that today’s emergency response agencies may face: CAD systems that are not linked across jurisdictions and, as a result, have difficultly responding to multi‐jurisdictional emergencies.

(U//FOUO) DHS-FBI Obama Inauguration Threats Warning

(U//FOUO) DHS and the FBI are concerned about the threat individuals affiliated with al-Shabaab—a radical Islamic extremist group active in Somalia—may pose to the Homeland, including locations and events of political significance, such as the upcoming Presidential Inauguration. DHS and FBI continue to monitor all reporting to establish the credibility of this threat; however, information concerning the threat is limited.

(U//LES) New Jersey ROIC: Soda Bottle Bombs Warning

The NJ ROIC has been monitoring two incidents involving reactionary devices on this date, 06/27/10, one that occurred at 0100 Hours in Lakewood Twp., Ocean Co., and another that occurred at 1145 Hours in Neptune Twp., Monmouth Co. Both incidents involved reactionary devices that are being described as soda bottles (12 oz. to 2 liters) containing a strong acid or base, aluminum foil inside the container, and tape securing the bottle cap. The substances inside these bottles create a chemical reaction, which results in pressure building in the bottle. Eventually, these containers explode creating a risk to law enforcement officers and first responders. First responders should keep a distance of at least 100 feet from any of these devices as a precautionary measure.

Fusion Center “Privacy and Civil Rights Framework” Enhancement

Over the past three years, federal, state, and local officials have worked tirelessly to ensure that robust privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties protections are integrated into fusion center policies and business processes. These efforts have included developing Baseline Capabilities and model privacy policy templates and providing training and subject-matter expertise to fusion centers.

(U//FOUO) DHS-Lawrence Livermore Unconventional Biological Laboratory Guide

(U//FOUO) Many innocuous reasons exist for the possession of some types of biological agents and associated laboratory equipment. For example, hobby, educational, or artistic uses such as home brewing or pilot-scale biotechnology research may include the same or similar equipment used in the malicious production of pathogens (see Figure). In some instances, however, the presence of a biological laboratory at an unconventional site could be an indicator of possible intent or capability to conduct bioterrorism.

(U//FOUO) DHS IED/VBIED Construction and Tactics Overview

(U//FOUO) The Intelligence Community currently has no specific, credible intelligence indicating that domestic or international terrorist organizations intend to use Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) or Vehicle-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VBIEDs) against targets within the Homeland. However, both foreign and domestic terrorist groups continue to use IEDs/VBIEDs as a frequently employed method of attack, and in particular, the frequency of lethal IED incidents overseas is cause for continuing concern.

(U//FOUO) DHS Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP) Homemade Explosive Warning

(U//FOUO) Terrorists could use the explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP), also referred to as acetone peroxide, in an attack against the United States. In December 2001, British shoe-bomber Richard Reid tried to detonate an explosive device with TATP as the initiator while aboard a flight from Paris to Miami. TATP can be made from hydrogen peroxide, acetone, and sulfuric acid. These ingredients are commonly available from drug stores, hardware stores, and car batteries. TATP is extremely sensitive to impact, friction, static/sparks, and heat, and may react violently to drug field testing.

(U//FOUO) New Jersey ROIC 2009 Threat Information

(U//FOUO) The NJ ROIC Analysis Element has no information regarding any specific, credible threat to New Jersey or the U.S. Homeland at this time. Due to an active, federal counterterror investigation, the NJ ROIC Analysis Element produced this overview of potential targets of terrorist activity and the tactics, techniques, and procedures that extremists may use. It was produced with information from FBI and DHS, based on analysis of police investigations, thwarted plots, and past terrorist attacks.

(U//FOUO) DHS Independence Day 2010 Awareness Note

(U//FOUO) The Homeland Infrastructure Threat and Risk Analysis Center (HITRAC) produces Infrastructure Protection Notes to provide information on risks impacting the critical infrastructure community including terrorist threats, natural hazards, and other events. This IP Note is a joint publication of the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) Homeland Counterterrorism Division and the Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP), and is designed to
promote security awareness and to identify actions that the critical infrastructure community can take to mitigate risks to the Nation’s critical infrastructure. As an update to the 26 May 2010 IP Note: Preparing for an Evolving Terrorist Threat, this IP Note serves as a reminder for the critical infrastructure community to remain vigilant during the 4 July 2010 Independence Day holiday.

DHS National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) Overview

DHS and DOJ officials have announced a new partnership to provide leadership for enhanced development of the Global Justice XML Data Model as a base for the deployment of the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM). NIEM will provide enhanced capabilities for organizations to share data across federal, state, local and tribal lines. This paper gives an overview of the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM). It outlines the background, concepts, objectives and the development strategy for implementing NIEM.

(U//FOUO) Louisiana Fusion Center Fake Anti-Virus Malware Warning

Over the past few days, there has been an increase in computers infected with Fake spyware and anti-virus malware. These infestations produce a popup stating that your machine is infected with viruses and offer a way to remove them. The object of this software is to trick you into believing you have viruses that need to be removed. A scan will launch after you “click” anywhere on the message and will request payment for removal of the “viruses”.

(U//FOUO) DHS Warning on Pressure Cooker IEDs

(U//FOUO) Rudimentary improvised explosive devices (IEDs) using pressure cookers to contain the initiator, switch, and explosive charge (typically ammonium nitrate or RDX) frequently have been used in Afghanistan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. Pressure cookers are common in these countries, and their presence probably would not seem out of place or suspicious to passersby or authorities. Because they are less common in the United States, the presence of a pressure cooker in an unusual location such as a building lobby or busy street corner should be treated as suspicious.

DHS Cybersecurity Research Roadmap

Global-scale identity management concerns identifying and authenticating entities such as people, hardware devices, distributed sensors and actuators, and software applications when accessing critical information technology (IT) systems from anywhere. The term global-scale is intended to emphasize the pervasive nature of identities and implies the existence of identities in federated systems that may be beyond the control of any single organization. This does not imply universal access or a single identity for all purposes, which would be inherently dangerous. In this context, global-scale identity management encompasses the establishment of identities, management of credentials, oversight and accountability, scalable revocation, establishment and enforcement of relevant policies, and resolution of potential conflicts. To whatever extent it can be automated, it must be administratively manageable and psychologically acceptable to users. It must, of course, also be embedded in trustworthy systems and be integrally related to authentication mechanisms and authorization systems, such as access controls. It also necessarily involves the trustworthy binding of identities and credentials. It is much broader than just identifying known individuals. It must scale to enormous numbers of users, computer systems, hardware platforms and components, computer programs and processes, and other entities.

(U//FOUO) DHS Attacks on Drinking Water Systems

(U//FOUO) Drinking water systems, especially treatment, distribution, and chemical storage facilities, may be targets for physical destruction, intentional contamination (possibly with chemical, biological or radiological materials), or cyber attack because the infrastructure is highly visible, less hardened, and more accessible than some other critical infrastructure. Terrorists have shown interest in biological agents that could be used for water contamination and, prior to 2003, planned surveillance of U.S. dams, reservoirs, and water supply systems to assess their potential as targets. Even a small-scale or thwarted attack could disrupt or deny service to businesses, households, and emergency responders or inspire public fear.

EPIC Contaminated Marijuana Warning

On June 3, 2010, Buncombe/Henderson North Carolina Joint Criminal Interdiction Task Force agents seized 45.45 kilograms (100 pounds) of marijuana that was intentionally contaminated with chemical irritants in Asheville, North Carolina, during a traffic stop. The drugs were seized from a 1994 Dodge Ram conversion van, with a temporary Colorado registration, that was stopped for a traffic violation on eastbound Interstate 40 at mile marker 43 in Asheville. The driver was allegedly travelling from Denver, Colorado, to Charlotte, North Carolina. The driver provided agents with a Mexican driver’s license and claimed to reside in Kansas City, Kansas. The agents requested, and received, consent to search the van. During the search a drug-detection canine alerted to a carpet-covered plywood bed platform that was built in the back of the van.

Alaska State Homeland Security Strategy 2010

Through this State Homeland Security Strategy (SHSS), the State of Alaska will improve its protection of the people, its economy, and its culture. The State of Alaska will reduce vulnerabilities to terrorist attacks, major disasters, or emergencies. This vital mission requires coordination, cooperation, and a focused effort throughout the state, federal agencies (military and civilian), state agencies, local jurisdictions, tribal, private, and non–profit organizations.